Former Liverpool youngster now an artist for top stars and has already made more money than from entire football career

FORMER Liverpool youngster David Moli has become a world renowned artist since hanging up his boots aged 24.

The 28-year-old lived with Raheem Sterling while the pair were working through the ranks at Anfield.

Times Newspapers LtdDavid Moli was forced to hang up his boots due to injury[/caption]

While Sterling has gone on to have an amazing football career, earning 82 England caps and winning multiple Prem titles, Moli has gone on to taste success in an entirely different field.

After leaving Liverpool in 2011, Moli joined Wolves’ academy before embarking on a career in the lower reaches of English and French football.

Following a career-ending injuries that caused him to hang up his boots aged just 24, Moli engaged his incredible artistic talent to launch a successful new venture.

Known professionally as “Boogie” – the former footballer prepared his debut exhibition at Manchester’s National Football Museum four years ago.

He has since collaborated with the likes of The Couture Club, Puma and boohooMan – and has an upcoming exhibition scheduled at London’s Quantus Gallery.

Sterling, 28, is among Boogie’s biggest supporters, and is the proud owner of several of his pieces.

While Jack Grealish, Marcus Rashford, Luke Shaw and Jesse Lingard have also bought artwork from Boogie.

Such has been Boogie’s remarkable success in the art world, that it has proven to be far more lucrative than his previous occupation.

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Boogie produced this stunning portrait of Pele

He revealed: “I’ve made more money in my first year as an artist than in my whole football career.”

On his priorities, he added: “I want to help and inspire others, and with art I get to do just that.”

Boogie’s work isn’t just football related; he has also produced portraits of stars such as Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe and Amy Winehouse.

He cites Warhol as one of his great influences, as well as Jean-Michel Basquiat, George Condo and Retna.

In an interview with The Times back in 2019, Boogie revealed that painting helped him overcome depression during his injury lay-offs.

He said: “I’ve always had an ability to put something creative on paper.

“When I was recovering from injury, it helped overcome depression. When you’re alone in your room, all you need is a canvas.”

His latest work will be displayed at the Quantus Gallery between June 8 and July 5.

Times Newspapers LtdBoogie’s latest work will be displayed at London’s Quantus Gallery this summer[/caption]